Low Tide at Mulberry Harbour in Normandy

Arromanches-les-Bains (Mulberry Harbour), Normandy

Arromanches-les-Bains, a small seaside town in Normandy, France, was the site of the WW2 artificial harbour known as Mulberry Harbour. The construction of the harbour used floating hollow concrete blocks of different shapes and sizes according to function and the three photos that follow show some of the surviving harbour components hidden when the water is up. It is possible to walk out onto the sands at low tide for a closer look.

The submerged.co.uk website gives more information here about Mulberry Harbour. It includes wartime photographs taken when the harbour was fully operational.

Click here for other photos taken at Arromanches on this website. 

Close-up of pontoon block on Arromanches beach with cliffs behind
Photo 1: pontoon block close-up

Photo 1: pontoon block close-up

Long pontoons led to the shore from a series of floating jetties and some blocks survive from one of these pontoons. The foreground of the first photo gives a close-up of one of the blocks and the background shows the cliffs and buildings at the east of the town.

Line of WW2 pontoon blocks at Mulberry Harbour resting on the sands at low tide looking out to sea
Photo 2: lines of pontoons and Phoenix caissons

Photo 2: lines of pontoons and Phoenix caissons

This photo shows the line of blocks that made up the pontoon looking out to sea. The blocks in the distance on the horizon are the surviving Phoenix caissons. These monumental blocks made up the outer wall of the artificial harbour.

Overview of Arromanches beach at low tide with row of pontoon blocks mid-field and other blocks on the far horizon
Photo 3: Phoenix caissons

Photo 3: Phoenix caissons

Looking east, the caissons on the horizon emphasise the vast scale of this created landscape. The line of pontoon blocks, so huge at close quarters, is visible on the sands at the left.